Category Archives: Miscellaneous

SB 3007, SD-2

SUBJECT:  INCOME, GENERAL EXCISE, MISCELLANEOUS, Public Disclosure of Credit Recipients

BILL NUMBER:  SB 3007, SD-2

INTRODUCED BY: Senate Committee on Ways & Means

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:   Requires the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to make a public disclosure identifying the names of the taxpayers who are receiving tax credits and the total amount of tax credit received for specific economic activities.

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SB 2696, SD-2

SUBJECT: MISCELLANEOUS; Feasibility Study on Green Fees

BILL NUMBER: SB 2696, SD-2

INTRODUCED BY: Senate Committee on Ways & Means

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:   Requires the office of planning to prepare a feasibility and implementation plan on assessing tourism green fees on a per visitor, per stay basis.  We do not think this concept is constitutionally sound because it could be seen as violating the constitutional right to travel and/or the Foreign Commerce Clause.

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SB 3007, SD-1

SUBJECT:  INCOME, GENERAL EXCISE, MISCELLANEOUS, Public Disclosure of Credit Recipients

BILL NUMBER:  SB 3007, SD-1

INTRODUCED BY: Senate Committee on Energy, Economic Development, and Tourism

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:   Requires the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to make a public disclosure identifying the names of the taxpayers who are receiving tax credits and the total amount of tax credit received for specific economic activities.

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SB 2810; HB 1821

SUBJECT:  MISCELLANEOUS, Require Injury in Fact Before Bringing Suit

BILL NUMBER:  SB 2810; HB 1821

INTRODUCED BY: SB by K. RHOADS; HB by SAIKI, BELATTI, C. LEE, MORIKAWA, NAKASHIMA

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Prohibits declaratory judgments when there is a cause of action and in other certain instances. Requires a plaintiff to show a personal stake in the actual controversy beyond a general disagreement or complaint by requiring a showing of an injury-in-fact.  We caution that this bill may be an over-reaction to a nonexistent problem.

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